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The 10 Best Starter Jobs In Pro Sports

These are the 10 best jobs to start your career in pro sports, as reported by Forbes.com. Read the original article HERE


Group Ticket Sales Rep

This job entails hitting the telephone to drum up sales for large groups. Top performers often make $100,000 or more annually by age 30, often moving into corporate sponsorship sales. Organizations want to see some type of sales experience in a résumé, even if it’s a part-time position in a retail store.

Customer Service Rep

Many sports teams offer entry-level spots geared to helping to organize events, like special days at the stadium or off-site gatherings for sponsors. Showing you can get a band on the field at the right time or set up a hospitality tent at a nearby park demonstrates organizational skills that senior management values.

Public Relations Assistant

Entry-level PR work means helping to write press releases and organizing media guides. Openings can be had with both teams and league offices. First step: Run to your college’s sports information department and volunteer for those duties. That experience is the first thing a hiring manager wants to see.

Client Service Assistant (Outside Agencies)

Outside sports agencies like IMG hire entry-level people to service corporate customers and help plan events. They’ll want a candidate who is organized and shows an interest in sports.

eMarketing/Database Management

A lot of grunt work here, such as inputting data from suite guests’ business cards to track who’s coming to the game. But do a good job, and you could find yourself selling suites before long. And a good sales track record there can be a fast track to management.

Graduate Assistant/Sports Information Department

As with players, the college level can be a good springboard to the pros. Writing press releases and helping to put together media notes can lead to suite and sponsorship sales. Major college sports programs, with their networking opportunities through bowl games and NCAA tournament appearances, are particularly valuable.

College Development Rep

Starting outside the sports arena, colleges often have openings for recent grads in alumni fundraising. Many move on to athletic fundraising, a potentially visible role on the way to the athletic director’s chair.

Account Associate (Outside Marketing Agency)

Some sports marketing consultants have entry-level spots that entail media tracking and monitoring, i.e. keeping and analyzing spreadsheet records of clients’ media coverage. Logistics planning for vendors can also be part of the job.

Marketing Analyst (Outside Marketing Firm)

College grads with strong analytical skills are put to work reviewing sports sponsorships, helping advertisers determine whether they’re getting sufficient bang for their buck. The job includes measuring market research results used to determine how well a sponsorship is helping a brand resonate with the public.

Researcher (Television)

Want to get into the media side of sports? Networks selectively hire researchers for events like the Olympics to interview athletes and coaches, write bios and compile statistics for on-camera hosts.

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What’s your desired starting job in sports? Have you worked in one of these positions already and can offer advice to any young professionals out there? Sound off in the comments!! Tweet at us @HPERCareers!

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Categories: Sport News

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Job opportunities for Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington majors are diverse and expanding as the emphasis on living a healthy lifestyle grows around the world. Career Services experts in each of our academic departments will provide one-on-one counseling and career building opportunities throughout your academic career, from choosing the right major to developing a strategy to find a job. They can assist you with:

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